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NUMERICAL MODELING OF WATER WAVES

by

Dr. Charles L. Mader

DVD CONTENTS OF TSUNAMI ANIMATIONS

( and other topics included with the book)

Media Player. The AVI files may be viewed in
Windows, Vista, or the IMAC OS X operating systems.
1960.MVE - May 23, 1960 tsunami generation in Chile, propagation across the Pacific
Ocean, and indundation of Hilo, Hawaii. Described in “Modeling Hilo, Hawaii Tsunami Inundation,”
Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 9, pp. 85-94 (1991), and Scientific Computing
and Automation, June issue, pp. 19-23 (1993).
1964.MVE - Tsunami of April 1, 1964 generation in Gulf of Alaska, propagation across
the Pacific Ocean, and inundation of Crescent City, California. See “Tsunami Inundation
Model Study of Eureka and Crescent City, California,” NOAA Tech. Memo. ERL PMEL-
105 (1994).
60THEAT.MVE - The interaction of the tsunami of May 23, 1960 with the Hilo, Hawaii
theater. Described in PACON 1993.
90HILO.MVE - 1990 Hilo topography and buildings inundated by a 1960 tsunami wave.
See also HOTEL.MVE.
2ATAST.MVE - The inundation of the U.S. East Coast by a 100 meter, 2000 second
tsunami wave that could be generated by an asteroid.
10NYAST.MVE - The inundation of the U.S. East Coast by a wave from the incompressible
collapse of a 10 kilometer radius cavity, 3000 meter deep and a 100 kilometer
radius cavity in the Atlantic Ocean off New York city.
AIMPACT.MVE - An impact cavity collapse and tsunami generation study using shallow
water and full Navier-Stokes models. Described in “Modeling Asteroid Impact and
Tsunami,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 16, pp. 21-30 (1998).
ATLAST.MVE - A tsunami in the Atlantic Ocean generated by the incompressible
collapse of a cavity 150 kilometer wide and 3500 meter deep.
AUSAST.MVE - Interaction of a tsunami with Australia from a Hawaii landslide generated
tsunami and from a cavity collapse generated tsunami. Described in “Modeling of
Tsunami Propagation Directed at Wave Erosion on Southeastern Australia Coast 105,000
Years Ago,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 13, pp. 45-52 (1995).
BBAY.MVE - A study of the vulnerability of Berau Bay, Indonesia to tsunamis.
CASCAD.MVE - Inundation of U.S. west coast by a tsunami from the Cascadia fault.
ECAST.MVE - The inundation of the U.S. East Coast by a tsunami generated by
the incompressible collapse of a 150 kilometer wide, 3000 meter deep cavity. See also
NYAST.MVE

TSUNAMI ANIMATIONS


ELTAST.MVE - Described in “Modeling the Eltanin Asteroid Tsunami,” Science of
Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 16, pp. 17-20 (1998).
EURAST.MVE - The inundation of Europe by a 100 meter high and 2000 sec period
tsunami.
EUREKA.MVE - The Eureka, California tsunami of April 25, 1992. See “Tsunami
Inundation Model Study of Eureka and Crescent City, California,” NOAA Tech. Memo.
ERL PMEL-105 (1994).
GUS.MVE - The Furumoto sources for the Hawaiian tsunamis of 1946, 1957, 1964
and 1965. Part of a source modeling project for Dr. A. Furumoto, Hawaii Civil Defense
Tsunami Advisor.
HIAST.MVE - The inundation of the Hawaiian Islands by a 100 meter high, 2000 second
period tsunami wave. Described in “Asteroid Tsunami Inundation of Hawaii,” Science of
Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 14, pp. 85-88 (1996).
HILAND.MVE - The tsunami generated by a landslide off the Kona coast of the island
of Hawaii about 105 Ka years ago. Described in “Modeling the 105 Ka Landslide Lanai
Tsunami,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 12, pp. 33-38 (1994).
HKAI.MVE - Inundation of Hawaii Kai, Hawaii by a typical off shore 3 meter high,
1500 second tsunami wave.
HOTEL.MVE - The interaction of a May 23, 1960 tsunami wave with current Hilo,
Hawaii tourist hotels. See also 90HILO.MVE.
HUMBOL.MVE - Tsunami inundation of Humboldt Bay, California by an offshore
maximum expectable 10 meter high, 2000 second tsunami wave. See “Tsunami Inundation
Model Study of Eureka and Crescent City, California,” NOAA Tech. Memo. ERL PMEL-
105 (1994).
ICEAST.MVE - The inundation of Iceland by a 100 meter high and 2000 sec period
tsunami.
INDIA.MVE - Tsunami in the Indian Ocean generated by the incompressible collapse
of a cavity 38 kilometer wide and 4000 meter deep.
INDONES.MVE - Indonesia tsunami of December 12, 1992.
JAPAST.MVE - The inundation of Tokyo, Japan by a tsunami generated by a incompressible
cavity collapse. Described in “Asteroid Tsunami Inundation of Japan,” Science of
Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 16, pp.11-16 (1998).
KAIAKA.MVE - Tsunami inundation of Kaiaka Bay, Oahu, HI by the 1952 tsunami.
KBAY.MVE - Tsunami inundation of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii by a typical offshore 3
meter high, 2000 second tsunami and by a maximum expectable offshore 10 meter high,
2000 second tsunami wave.
KONA.MVE - Tsunami inundation of Kona, Hawaii by a typical offshore 3 meter high,
2000 second tsunami wave.
KURIL.MVE - The tsunami of October 1994 generated off the Kuril islands of Japan.
LAAST.MVE - Inundation of Los Angeles, California by a 100 meter high, 2000 second
period tsunami wave.
LAPALMA.MVE - Modeling the proposed La Palma landslide tsunami. Published in
“ Modeling the La Palma Landslide Tsunami,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 19, pp.
160-180 (2001).
LAUP.MVE - The April 1, 1946 tsunami inundation of Laupahoehoe, Hawaii.
LITUYA.MVE - The July 8, 1958 mega-tsunami at Lituya Bay, Alaska with inundations
up to 520 meters. Described in “Modeling the 1958 Lituya Bay Mega-Tsunami,”
Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 17, pp. 57-67 (1999). The Lituya Bay impact landslide
generation of the tsunami is described in Chapter 6 and in Science of Tsunami Hazards,
Vol. 20, pp. 241-250 (2002).

LISBON.MVE - Modeling the 1755 Lisbon tsunami generation and propagation across
the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean. Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 19, pp. 93-98
(2001).

LOIHI.MVE - A study using the ZUNI full Navier-Stokes code of the tsunami wave
generation and propagation from the collapse of the Loihi, Hawaii summit in August, 1996.
M9CALIF.MVE - An M9 earthquake generated tsunami interacting with Oregon and
California coast.
NIC.MVE - The tsunami generated off the coast of Nicaragua in 1992. Described in
“ Modeling the 1992 Nicaragua Tsunami,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 11, pp. 107-110
(1993).
NYAST.MVE - The inundation of the U.S. Coast by the incompressible collapse of a
100 kilometer radius 3000 meter deep cavity. Another tsunami wave had a height of 100
meters and a 2000 second period. See also 10NYAST.MVE.
ORAST.MVE - A 100 meter high, 2000 sec period tsunami interacting with the Oregon
coast.
OREGM9.MVE - An M9 earthquake generated tsunami interacting with the Oregon
coast.
PACAST.MVE - Tsunami in the middle of the Pacific formed from the incompressible
collapse of a cavity 150 kilometer wide and 4500 meter deep.
PROP.MVE - Described in the publication “Numerical Tsunami Propagation Study,”
Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 11, pp. 93-106 (1993) and in Chapter 5 of Numerical
Modeling of Water Waves - Second Edition.
SANDY.MVE - Tsunami inundation of Sandy Beach region of Oahu, Hawaii by a
typical offshore 3 meter high, 2000 second tsunami and by a maximum expectable offshore
10 meter high, 2000 second tsunami wave.
SANFAST.MVE - Inundation of San Francisco, California by a 100 meter high, 2000
second tsunami wave.
SKAGWAY.MVE - The landslide generated tsunami of November 3, 1994 at Skagway,
Alaska. The Skagway modeling is described in “Modeling the 1994 Skagway Tsunami,”
Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 15, pp. 41-48 (1997). See also SOLA.MVE.
SMSFAST.MVE - Inundation of San Francisco by a tsunami wave generated by the
incompressible collapse of a 20 kilometer wide, 3000 meter deep cavity.
SOLA.MVE - Three-dimensional, full Navier-Stokes modeling using the MCC SOLA
code of the November 3, 1994 Skagway, Alaska tsunami. See also SKAGWAY.MVE.
SOURCE.MVE - Described in “Numerical Tsunami Source Study,” Science of
Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 11, pp.81-92 (1993) and in Chapter 5 of Numerical Modeling of
Water Waves - Second Edition.
VSLIDE.MVE - A landslide generated tsunami from Chain of Craters road region of
the island of Hawaii.

TSUNAMI ANIMATIONS


WAIANAE.MVE - The inundation of the leeward side of Oahu, Hawaii by a maximum
expectable offshore 10 meter high, 2000 second tsunami wave.
WAIPIO.MVE - The interaction of the May 23, 1960 tsunami with the Waipio, Hawaii
region. The 50 foot inundation is the largest recorded in Hawaii.
WALKER.MVE - An evaluation of the vulnerability of Hawaii to tsunamis generated
south of Honolulu, either along the Kona Coast or in the Tonga trench. Modeling requested
by Dr. D. Walker, Oahu Civil Defence Tsunami Advisor.
WINDWARD.MVE - Tsunami inundation of the Windward side of Oahu, Hawaii by a
typical offshore 3 meter high, 2000 second tsunami and by a maximum expectable offshore
10 meter high, 2000 second tsunami wave.


NOBEL POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS


NOBEL Directory


A collection of PowerPoint presentations describing water wave studies performed using
the compressible hydrodynamic code NOBEL. The studies are described in Chapter 6 of
Numerical Modeling of Water Waves - Second Edition.
For Windows operating systems the PowerPoint presentations may be viewed using
PPVIEW in /NOBEL/PPRESENT/ or for Windows and VISTA operating systems using
PPTVIEW in /CLASSPPT/PPTVIEW.
LITUYA - The July 8, 1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska impact landslide tsunami generation.
A mega-tsunami was generated that reached an altitude of 520 meters. Laboratory experiments
and numerical modeling results are presented. Described in “Modeling the 1958
Lituya Bay Mega-Tsunami, II,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 20, pp. 241-250 (2002).
CAVITY - The generation of cavities in water by projectile impacts and by explosives is
described both experimentally and using compressible hydrodynamic models. Described in
“ Dynamics of Water Cavity Generation,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 21, pp. 91-118
(2003).
ASTWAVE - The generation of tsunamis by the impact of a 0.25 to 1 kilometer diameter
asteroid at 20 kilometer/sec with 5 kilometer of ocean and 5 kilometer of basalt is modeled
using compressible hydrodynamics in two and three dimensions. Described in “Two- and
Three-Dimensional Simulations of Asteroid Ocean Impacts, ” Science of Tsunami Hazards,
Vol. 21, pp. 119-134 (2003).
KTIMPACT - The KT Chicxulub asteroid impact event is modeled using the threedimensional
compressible Navier Stokes model. Described in “Two- and Three-Dimensional
Asteroid Impact Simulations,” Computers in Science and Engineering (2004).
KRAKATOA - The August 27, 1883 hydrovolcanic explosion of Krakatoa is modeled
using the full Navier-Stokes code NOBEL making use of the high pressure physics of explosions
included in the code. Described in “Numerical Model for the Krakatoa Hydrovolcanic
Explosiion and Tsunami,” Science of Tsunami Hazards, Vol. 24, pp. 174-182 (2006).

DVD CODE DIRECTORIES


The PLPLOT subdirectory contains versions of the codes using ABSOFT FORTRAN
with PLPLOT graphics for Windows 95, 98, ME, XP and VISTA.
The IMAC directory contains versions of the codes using ABSOFT FORTRAN with
PLPLOT graphics for Apple IMAC System OS X.
WAVE - The WAVE code described in Chapter 1 solves the equations for Airy, thirdorder
Stokes and Laitone solitary gravity waves. The directory contains the FORTRAN
source code, the executable code for DOS or Windows and WAVE.PDF which describes the
code.
SWAN - The shallow-water SWAN code described in Chapter 2 solves the long wave,
shallow water, nonlinear equations of fluid flow. The directory contains the FORTRAN
source and executable codes which generate a graphics file that may be processed using
the programs included. It also includes a description of the input to the code in the file
SWAN.PDF. Examples and topographic files are furnished.
ZUNI - The incompressible Navier-Stokes ZUNI code described in Chapter 3 solves the
incompressible, viscous fluid flows with a free surface using the Navier-Stokes equations.
A detailed description of the computer program and its input file is included in the file
ZUNI.PDF. The FORTRAN source and the executable codes are included.
SOLA - The incompressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes ZUNI code described
in Chapter 4 solves the incompressible viscous fluid flows with a free surface using the
Navier-Stokes equations. The FORTRAN source and the executable codes are included.
The Skagway 1994 tsunami is used as an example.
LGW - The Carrier linear gravity wave LGW code described in Chapter 5 uses analytical
methods for solving the linear gravity model. The FORTRAN source and executable
codes are included. Examples of Gaussian tsunamis described in Chapter 5 are furnished.
TIDE - A classic computer program for calculating tides with the FORTRAN source
and executable codes furnished.

SHORT COURSE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS


• CLASSPPT\CHAPT1 - Chapter 1 - Water Wave Theory
• CLASSPPT\CHAPT2 - Chapter 2 - The Shallow Water Model
• CLASSPPT\CHAPT34 - Chapters 3 and 4 - Incompressible Navier-Stokes
• CLASSPPT\CHAPT5 - Chapter 5 - Evaluation of Incompressible Models
• CLASSPPT\CHAPT6 - Chapter 6 - Compressible Model and NOBEL Code
• CLASSPPT\12-26-2004 - The 12-26-2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
• CLASSPPT\LAPALMA - The LaPalma Landslide Cold Fusion Tsunami
• CLASSPPT\LISBON - The 1755 Lisbon Tsunami
• CLASSPPT\SAWG - Hawaii Tsunami Scientific Working Group Studies
CLASSPPT\SAWG\HAWAIIKAI - The Hawaii Kai, HI Tsunami Hazard
CLASSPPT\SAWG\M9MODELS - Tsunamis from M9+ Earthquakes
in the Tonga, Marainas and Japan Trenches
CLASSPPT\SAWG\MEADOWS -
Hawaii Tsunami Hazard from Indian Ocean Type Tsunami
CNMWW.PDF is a searchable PDF file of the book Numerical Modeling of Water
Waves - Second Edition with many figures in color.

SCIENCE OF TSUNAMI HAZARDS (Also found at the Tsunami Society present website)
STH.PDF Directory


All the Science of Tsunami Hazards journals thru 2006 in PDF format may be searched
using Adobe Acrobat 4.0 or higher. Issues of the journal are archived at
http://epubs.lanl.gov/tsunami .


Dir = TS251.PDF, TS252.PDF, TS253.PDF
* Volume 25 (No. 1), (No. 2), (No. 3) 2006
Dir = TS241.PDF, TS242.PDF, TS243.PDF, TS244.PDF, TS245.PDF
* Volume 24 (No. 1), (No. 2), (No. 3), (No. 4), (No. 5) 2006
Dir = TS231.PDF, TS232.PDF, TS233.PDF
* Volume 23 (No. 1), (No. 2), (No. 3) 2005
Dir = TS221.PDF, TS222.PDF, TS223.PDF
* Volume 22 (No. 1), (No. 2), (No. 3) 2004
Dir = TS211.PDF, TS212.PDF, TS213.PDF, TS214.PDF
* Volume 21 (No. 1 ), (No. 2), (No. 3), (No. 4) 2003
Dir = TS201.PDF, TS202.PDF, TS203,PDF, TS204.PDF, TS205.PDF
* Volume 20 (No. 1 ), (No. 2 ), (No. 3), (No. 4), (No. 5), 2002
DIR = TS191.PDF, TS192.PDF, TS193.PDF
* Volume 19 (No. 1 ) (No. 2 ) (No. 3) , 2001
DIR = TS181.PDF, TS182.PDF
* Volume 18 (No. 1 ) (No. 2) , 2000
DIR = TS171.PDF, TS172.PDF, TS173.PDF
* Volume 17 (No. 1 ) (No. 2 ) (No. 3), 1999
DIR = TS161.PDF
* Volume 16 (No. 1 ), 1998
DIR = TS151.PDF, TS152.PDF
* Volume 15 (No. 1 ) (No. 2 ), 1997
DIR = TS143.PDF, TS142.PDF, TS141.PDF
* Volume 14 (No. 3 ) (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1996
DIR = TS131.PDF
* Volume 13 (No. 1 ), 1995
DIR = TS122.PDF, TS121.PDF
* Volume 12 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1994
DIRECTORY = TS112.PDF, TS111.PDF
* Volume 11 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1993
DIRECTORY = TS101.PDF
* Volume 10 (No. 1 ), 1992
DIRECTORY = TS092.PDF, TS091.PDF
* Volume 9 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1991
DIRECTORY = TS082.PDF, TS081.PDF
* Volume 8 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1990

SCIENCE OF TSUNAMI HAZARDS
DIRECTORY = TS072.PDF, TS071.PDF
* Volume 7 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1989
DIRECTORY = TS061.PDF
* Volume 6 (No. 1 ), 1988
DIRECTORY = TS052.PDF, TS051.PDF
* Volume 5 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1987
DIRECTORY = TS043.PDF, TS042.PDF, TS041.PDF
* Volume 4 (No. 3 ) (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1986
DIRECTORY = TS031.PDF
* Volume 3 (No. 1 ), 1985
DIRECTORY = TS022.PDF, TS021.PDF
* Volume 2 (No. 2 ) (No. 1 ), 1984
DIRECTORY = TS011.PDF
* Volume 1 (No. 1 ), 1982

...............

................Tsunami ... Earthquakes .. Seismotectonics .. Hurricanes ... Volcanic Eruptions..Tornadoes..Natural Disasters. Disaster Archaeology. Climate Change . Ocean Governance

Announcements .. Completed Events .. Special Bulletins: Recent Disasters .. Books & Book Reviews .. Tsunami Society

Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis:. Bio Summary .. Publications .. Recent Publications .. Recent Books .. Miscellaneous Writings .. Consulting Services

.......................

Web Design by Dr. Carolyn Carayannis Copyright 2008 / all rights reserved. © Copyright 1963-2007 George Pararas-Carayannis / all rights reserved / Information on this site is for viewing and personal information only - protected by copyright. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of material from this site without written permission is prohibited. Material included at the website links above is for informative and educational purposes and for disaster preparedness only. Any predictions of large earthquakes, destructive tsunamis, or any other natural disasters presented in these pages are based primarily on statistical determinations of the historical recurrence frequencies of such events. Such historical/statistical approaches are used only for long-term predictions. There is no intent by the author to predict or forecast any type of natural disaster or to frighten people.

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